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Frequently Asked Questions

Section 1: Glasses

  1. Who can buy from Swift Eyewear?
  2. How do I order? Which lenses are for me?
  3. What is a PD?
  4. How do I measure my PD?
  5. How to read my prescription?
  6. What are the common types of ocular conditions?
  7. What is the difference between Transition and Progressive Lenses?
  8. What do I do if I have a high prescription and don't want thick or bulky lenses?
  9. What are High Definition Lenses?
  10. How do I use your Virtual Mirror to try glasses on?

Section 2: Contact Lenses

  1. Can a friend wear my contact lenses?
  2. What are the DO's and DON'Ts of contact lenses?
  3. How to handle, clean, store contact lenses?

Section 3: Service Questions

  1. How do I return an item?

 

Section 1: Glasses

1. Who can buy from Swift Eyewear?

Any individual that has a valid prescription and is a resident of Canada and the United States, however, a prescription is not required to buy sunglasses from Swift Eyewear. Note: Respecting the laws and regulations within different states or provinces please follow those that pertain to you.
 
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2. How do I order?

In order to purchase ophthalmic glasses (commonly known as eyeglasses) online, you will need a valid prescription from your optometrist or ophthalmologist. If you don't have your prescription handy, simply contact your most recent optometrist or ophthalmologist to request a new copy of your prescription. We strongly advise that you leave every eye exam with your new prescription in hand! Please make sure you're complying with your state or province.
 
Step 1: Select Your Frame
  1. Selecting your desired frame with Swift Eyewear is straightforward. Simply use our menu options to choose your preferred shape or style - you can also use it to further narrow down your search by selecting your desired frame material; lens type; gender; color and other parameters.
  2. Once you have selected the frames you like you have the benefit of using our Virtual Mirror to get an idea of how they will look once they are on. Our Virtual Mirror also has the bonus of allowing you to upload a photo of yourself to get the reassurance you deserve. For further guidance on how to use our Virtual Mirror, please refer to the FAQ How do I use the Virtual Mirror Application?"
Step 2: Customize Your Glasses and Submit Your Prescription
 
1. Once you've found the frame for you, simply click the "Continue" button and choose which lenses you are looking for. Not sure which lenses you are looking for? No need to worry, a descriptive list follows:
  • Single Vision Distance Lenses - these lenses will aid you with seeing and sharpening objects and print that are far away
  • Single Vision Reading Lenses - these lenses will aid you with seeing and magnifying text, or, in other words for just reading books, magazines, the newspaper, etc. Remember, you are not able to see things in the distance with this type of lens.
  • Progressive Lenses - these lenses will be worn at all times to accomplish your daily activities. They are a blended lens mixing both your distance and reading prescriptions together. Most people who wear these lenses have an ADD on their prescription from their optometrist or ophthalmologist. The Progressive lens gradient starts with your distance prescription, at the top of the lens and reaches your maximum addition power, or the full reading addition, at the bottom of the lens; creating an hourglass shape. It is also referred to as anInvisible Bifocal Lens" and you should keep in mind that there will be minor distortion on each side of the lenses due to the blending of the different prescriptions; however a High Definition lens will reduce distortion. A rule of thumb is to point with your nose in the direction you want to see clearly and slightly move your head up and down to experience the different viewing distances in these lenses.
  • Bifocal Lenses - these lenses will be worn at all times to accomplish your daily activities. They are similar to the Progressive Lens as they contain your distance and reading prescriptions, however, they are not blended. In other words, a visible line will appear at the bottom inner corners of each lens, which will hold your reading prescription, and the rest of the lens will hold your distance prescription.
  • Computer Lenses - If you're experiencing eye strain or blurred vision during computer work it may be due to an inability of your eyes to remain accurately focused on your screen or because your eyes have trouble changing focus from your keyboard to your screen and back again for prolonged periods. These focusing problems often are associated with Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS).
  • Plano Lenses - If you don't have a prescription but like to wear eyeglasses or want to change the appearance of your eyes using novelty (colored) contact lenses, then these lenses are for you. For this type of lens, no power or acuity correction is required. Another use for plano lenses would be for someone who may need a prescription in one lens of their spectacles, but not in the other. In this case the lens is simply a placeholder that does nothing, with equal parallel curved surfaces.
 
2. Once you have selected the type of lens you are looking for you will then have to select any coatings that you like, or, any additions you want your lenses to have, for example, tinting, protective coatings, or Transitions lenses. Not sure which coatings you are looking for? No need to worry, please refer to the descriptive list that follows:
  • Scratch-Resistant Coating - a film (or coating) that is applied to the faces of a lens and does not interfere with how the lenses function and does not affect vision, but creates a permanent bond with the lens that reduces the appearance of hairline scratches which is common to eyeglass lenses. Remember, this coating is scratch-resistant and not scratch-proof, but it will help to prevent minor scratches that can easily happen to a regular lens.
  • Anti-Reflection Coating - is a coating applied to the surface of lenses to reduce reflection. This coating is beneficial because the decreased reflection will sharpen the appearance of your lens; produce less glare, which is particularly noticeable when driving at night or working in front of a computer monitor. The benefits from decreasing glare means that you will often find your eyes are less tired, particularly at the end of the day and by allowing more light to pass through the lens will increase contrast and, therefore, increase your visual acuity.
  • Transitions Lenses - Transitions are the lenses that go dark when you are exposed to UV rays. These lenses are designed to quickly adapt from clear indoors to fully dark in brightest sun. Remember, Transitions lenses continuously adapt to changing light so they're always exactly the shade you need them to be.
  • Tints- you can customize your lenses to have any type of tint you desire, whether it be a soft blue or pink or a dark grey or brown. Remember, this is not a Transitions lens and will be permanently visible at all times.The color of the lens can vary depending on style, fashion, and purpose, but for general use, red, grey, green, or brown are recommended to avoid or minimize color distortion, which could affect safety when, for instance, driving a car or a school bus.
  • Polarized Lenses - this type of lens will give you the ultimate protection from damaging UV rays from the sun. So, how does it work? When light bounces off of a surface, its waves tend to be strongest in a particular direction usually horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. This is called polarization. Sunlight bouncing off a surface like water, a road, or metal will usually reflect horizontally, striking the viewer's eyes intensely and creating glare. Most polarized lenses in glasses are laminated with tiny vertical stripes that only allow vertically angled light to enter the wearer's eyes. Glare is eliminated because the horizontal light waves cannot bypass the vertical filter.
  • Mirrored Lenses - a mirrored coating can also be applied to the lens. This type of lens is an alternative to polarization for UV protection. This mirrored coating deflects some of the light when it hits the lens so that it is not transmitted through the lens, making it useful in bright conditions; however, it does not necessarily reflect UV radiation as well. However, the color of the mirrored surface is irrelevant to the color of the lens. For example, a gray lens can have a blue mirror coating, and a brown lens can have a silver coating. A bonus of a mirror coating is that it does not get hot in sunlight and it prevents scattering of rays in the lens bulk.
You can easily submit your prescription on the order form provided or you can send it by fax or e-mail, whichever is most convenient for you! If you choose to send your prescription by fax, please send it to 604-435-8181. If you're sending a copy via e-mail, please send it to rx@swifteyewear.com.
 
Having problems reading or submitting your prescription? Read our prescription guide or just contact us at 1-888-388-3334. Our optical experts will be happy to help you!
 
Step 3: Add Your Frames and Lens to Your Cart!
 
Simply add your item to your cart as you would making any other purchase. You can view items in your cart at any time by clicking on the "Cart" link at the top right of any page.
 
After submitting your prescription, double check your order to make sure your prescription is correct. Once your order has been added to the cart you will then proceed to check out and enter your billing and shipping information! That's it!
 
ENJOY YOUR NEW SWIFT EYEWEAR PRODUCT.
 
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3. What is a pupillary distance (PD)?

Your PD is the distance measured in millimeters, from the middle of your left pupil to the middle of the right pupil. With the PD we can align the center of the eye with the optical center of the lens. Remember, positioning lenses correctly in relation to the center of the pupils is especially important for higher powered prescriptions due to the location of the center of the lenses. A few key pointers:
  • The typical pupillary distance for adults is around 54–68 mm, while measurements generally fall between 48 and 73 mm.
  • For children the measurement usually ranges from 41 to 55 mm.

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4. How do I measure my PD?

Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may have included your PD measurement on your prescription. This measurement is normally outlined underneath the sphere, cylinder, axis and ADD columns on your prescription. Please note that the OD (right) measurement will always be listed first and the OS (left) measurement will follow; whether it is horizontally (side by side) or vertically (up and down) listed on your prescription. A PD can be listed in one of two ways:
  • A combined number. For example, it may state a PD of 62. If this is the case then you will have to divide the number by 2 and that will give you a PD for each eye. You will then use those numbers when providing your PD measurement during your order. In this case it would be 31 for your right eye and 31 for your left eye.
  • Two separate numbers. For example, it may state 29 and 31 (or 29 and 29). If this is the case then you will use those exact numbers when providing your PD measurement during your order.
If you do not have access to your PD measurement then you can follow the steps below and take it yourself. We do recommend having a friend assist you in order to gain the most accurate measurements. Follow the steps below:
  1. Print The Ruler: Print this page at 100% size using the NO SCALING setting.
  2. Fold: Fold along the dotted line at the bottom of the page.
  3. Look in a Mirror or Find a Friend: For most accurate measurements, get a friend to help you, but we've made one side a mirror image so you can read it while looking at your reflection. Stand 8 inches (20 cm) away from a mirror or a friend.
  4. Ready. Set. Measure: 
  • Place and hold the PD ruler against your forehead, aligning the 0 with the bridge (center) of your nose. Remember to keep your face straight and begin with your RIGHT eye.
  • The distance from the center of your bridge (where the 0 is) to the distance of the center of your pupil is your PD measurement for your RIGHT eye (and it will be measured in millimeters).
  • Repeat STEP 4 for the measurement of your LEFT eye.

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5. PRESCRIPTION GUIDE: How do I read my prescription?

We know that reading a prescription can be hard at times. What do all those numbers on your eyeglass prescription mean? And what about all those abbreviated terms, such as OD, OS, OU, SPH and CYL?
  • DV refers to distance vision
  • NV refers to near vision
  • OD refers to your right eye
  • OS refers to your left eye
  • OU refers to both eyes
  • SPH (sphere) refers to the amount of lens power, measured in diopters (D), and prescribed to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.
  • CYL (cylinder) refers to the amount of lens power for astigmatism. If nothing appears in this column, either you have no astigmatism, or your astigmatism is so slight that it is not really necessary to correct it with your eyeglass lenses. NOTE: The number in the cylinder column may be preceded with a minus sign (for the correction of nearsighted astigmatism) or a plus sign (for farsighted astigmatism). Cylinder power always follows sphere power in an eyeglass prescription.
  • AXIS specifies the direction of the cylindrical power. The spherical (sphere) and the cylindrical (cylinder) are the power or amount of correction you require in order to correct your vision. Unfortunately, due to the complexity of the axis explaining the difference between them requires a course in optics, but we would be more than happy to answer any further questions by email or phone. In hind sight, the spherical is power in all directions of the lens and the cylindrical is additional power in only one direction of the lens. Lastly, the axis is defined with a number from 1 to 180.
  • ADD is the added magnifying power applied to the bottom part of multifocal lenses to correct presbyopia (a description of presbyopia follows). The number appearing in this section of the prescription is always aplus" power, even if it is not preceded by a plus sign. Generally it will range from +0.75 to +3.00 D and will be the same power for both eyes.
  • PRISM is the amount of prismatic power, measured in prism diopters, prescribed to compensate for eye alignment problems. Only a small percentage of eyeglass prescriptions include prism. NOTE: Due to the complexity of prisms Swift Eyewear will not fill any prescription with prism. We recommend that you talk to your local optometrist or optician.

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6. What are the most common types of ocular conditions?

  • Myopia - commonly known as being nearsighted and shortsighted, is a condition of the eye where the light that comes in does not directly focus on the retina and instead focuses in front of it. This causes the image that one sees when looking at a distant object to be out of focus, but in focus when looking at a close object.
  • Hyperopia - also known as farsightedness, long-sightedness or hypermetropia, is a defect of vision caused by an imperfection in the eye (often when the eyeball is too short or the lens cannot become round enough), causing difficulty focusing on near objects, and in extreme cases causing a sufferer to be unable to focus on objects at any distance. As an object moves toward the eye, the eye must increase its optical power to keep the image in focus on the retina. If the power of the cornea and lens is insufficient, as in hyperopia, the image will appear blurred.
  • Astigmatism - is an optical defect in which vision is blurred due to the inability of the optics of the eye to focus a point object into a sharp focused image on the retina. This may be due to an irregular or toric curvature of the cornea or lens. The two types of astigmatism are regular and irregular. Irregular astigmatism is often caused by a corneal scar or scattering in the crystalline lens, and cannot be corrected by standard spectacle lenses, but can be corrected by contact lenses. Regular astigmatism arising from either the cornea or crystalline lens can be corrected by a toric lens. If your prescription contains numbers in the Sphere, Cylinder, and Axis fields then you require lenses for astigmatism.
  • Presbyopia - is a condition associated with aging; the eye exhibits a progressively diminished ability to focus on near objects. Presbyopia's exact mechanisms are not known with certainty; the research evidence most strongly supports a loss of elasticity of the crystalline lens, although changes in the lens's curvature from continual growth and loss of power of the ciliary muscles (the muscles that bend and straighten the lens) have also been postulated as its cause. Like gray hair and wrinkles, presbyopia is a symptom caused by the natural course of aging. The first signs of presbyopia – eyestrain, difficulty seeing in dim light, problems focusing on small objects and/or fine print – are usually first noticed between the ages of 40 and 50. If you prescription contains an ADD power then you require bifocal or progressive lenses in order to perfect your vision for distance and up close objects. If you have any problems reading your prescription please email us at customerservice@swifteyewear.com or call us at 1(888)-388-3334. We will be glad to help you.

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7. What is the difference between Transition and Progressive lenses?

  • Transitions Lenses - Transitions are the lenses that go dark when you are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) rays. These lenses are designed to quickly adapt from clear indoors to fully dark in brightest sun. Remember, Transitions lenses continuously adapt to changing light so they're always exactly the shade you need them to be.
  • Progressive Lenses - these lenses will be worn at all times to accomplish your daily activities. They are a blended lens mixing both your distance and reading prescriptions together. Most people who wear these lenses have an ADD on their prescription from their optometrist or ophthalmologist. The Progressive lens gradient starts with your distance prescription, at the top of the lens and reaches your maximum addition power, or the full reading addition, at the bottom of the lens; creating an hourglass shape. It is also referred to as anInvisible Bifocal Lens" and you should keep in mind that there will be minor distortion on each side of the lenses due to the blending of the different prescriptions. A rule of thumb is to point with your nose in the direction you want to see clearly and slightly move your head up and down to experience the different viewing distances in these lenses.

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8. What do I do if I have a high prescription and don't want thick or bulky lenses?

In order to eliminate thick or bulky lenses you will require a lens made of thin material. Luckily, there are two options available to help solve this problem.
  • High-Index Lenses - When it comes to having a high prescription the lenses will be thicker and more noticeable in your frame. If you want to eliminate the bulkiness, try lenses in a high-index material, which are made of plastic. They offer superior optics in a thinner, lighter lens. Aside from thinness of the lens, another advantage of high-index plastics is they're strength and shatter resistance, although not as shatter resistant as polycarbonate.
  • Polycarbonate Lenses - are lighter, thinner and more impact-resistant than regular plastic lenses, as they are shatter proof. They're great for safety glasses, sports eyeglasses and children's eyewear.

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9. What are High Definition Lenses?

High-Definition Lenses - This type of lens will reduce the distortion found in a progressive lens, also known as the invisible bifocal. This distortion is found on both sides of the lens and is caused from blending your distance and reading prescription together amongst the height of the lens. The fabrication of these lenses takes into account how they are positioned in front of your eyes when in the frame, to provide the most accurate lens power and the sharpest vision possible.
 
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10. How do I use your Virtual Mirror Application to try glasses on?

Using our virtual mirror is very easy. For the most accurate results please use a still straight front-on picture of yourself, however, we do have a webcam option to try on glasses as well.
 
Method 1: Upload a Picture
  1. Select the frame you wish to try on and click the "Get Started" button located in the bottom right corner of every frame page.
  2. Click the "Upload" button and select your picture.
  3. The Virtual Mirror Application will automatically adjust the picture to a more accurate size, however, you may need to do further adjusting yourself in a later stage.
  4. Enter your PD in the PUPPILARY DISTANCE section located underneath the bottom right corner of your uploaded picture. Two white circles will appear on your picture once you have entered your PD measurements where your eyes are located (or relatively close).
  5. If you have one number on your prescription in the PD section then you will have to divide it by 2 in order to get the measurements for both your left and right eye.
  6. If you have two separate numbers on your prescription in the PD section then you will enter those numbers exactly like they are written. Your PD will be listed either horizontally (side by side) or vertically (up and down).The first number will represent the measurement for your right eye and the number beside it will represent the measurement for your left eye.
  7. You will now have to use the ZOOM tool for the picture itself. You will find this option underneath the bottom left corner of your uploaded picture. Use this tool until the white circles are lined up with your pupils (or center of your eyes).
  8. You may have to reposition the frame itself. You can do this by placing your cursor over your uploaded picture (a white hand will appear). You can now drag the glasses down to align the white circles with your pupils and center the frame on your face. Note: Leave the FRAME tool at 0% in order to get the most accurate picture of how the glasses will look on your face. By leaving the frame size at 0% you will be using the accurate size of the frame against your uploaded picture, which will help guarantee that the frame will be a perfect fit.
  9. Now you are ready to take the picture. In order to take the snapshot of your uploaded picture wearing the glasses you will have to click thePLUS" symbol located in the bottom left corner of your picture. Once you have clicked thePLUS" button you have the options of saving or emailing the image or sharing it to one of the social networking sites.
 
Method 2: Webcam Photo
  1. Click on the webcam icon located in the top left corner of the Virtual Mirror Application. This will turn your webcam on. You may have to accept the settings in order to proceed.
  2. The frames will be floating in the middle of the screen. You will need to position your face, keeping it straight, within the screen. The Virtual Mirror has a face detection function which will allow the frame to follow you around (should you move), if this occurs it may become off balanced and you will need to press theRedetect face" button located in the top left corner underneath the webcam button.
  3. Once you have your face aligned all that is left for you to do is press the capture button located in the bottom left corner of the Virtual Mirror Application screen. Once you have clicked thePLUS" button you have the options of saving or emailing the image or sharing it to one of the social networking sites. Note: There is no PD option when using the webcam function of the Virtual Mirror. Keep in mind that the size of the frame in comparison to your webcam photo may be different in person and using the still straight front-on picture of yourself will generate more accurate results. For further assistance please give us call at 1 (888) 388-3334 or contact one of our Customer Service Agents through our chat application.

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Section 2: Contact Lenses

1. Can a friend wear my contact lenses?

No, you should never let anyone else wear your lenses for two reasons. The first one being that if you share the same lenses, it can increase your risk of getting an eye infection and the second one being that only an eye care professional can determine if the lenses are right for your friend. A prescription changes from person to person and they should seek consultation from their optometrist before trying any type of contact lens.
 
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2. The DO's and DON'Ts of Contact Lenses

DO:
  1. Wash hands with soap
  2. Follow wearing schedules specified by your optician, or no more than 12 hours per day
  3. Apply hair spray BEFORE insertion and in a separate room
  4. Apply make-up AFTER insertion of contact lenses
  5. Keep contact lens case CLEAN
  6. Make sure lens is set at the bottom of the case before putting the cap on
DON'T:
  1. Never insert lenses over a sink
  2. Never swim, shower, or store lenses in water
  3. Never sleep with contact lenses (unless they are specially made for it), if this occurs, use rewetting drops before removal and keep lenses off for at least 24 hours (if rewetting drops are unavailable keep blinking until you are able to take contact lens off with ease)
  4. Never use Visine, or medical drops while wearing contacts lenses (EVER)
  5. Never wear contact lenses in dusty environments
  6. Never wear contact lenses when uncomfortable or painful, see your optician
  7. Don't switch solution brands while using the same lens. Different chemical ingredients can deform or deteriorate the lens. Wait until you open a fresh set of contact lenses before switching solution brands.

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3. How to handle, clean, store contact lenses

  • Handling - Prior to handling, make sure to wash your hands and dry them with a lint-free towel. Remember to never handle a lens that has dried up, as it will irritate the eye and can lead to severe eye infections. If the contact has lost its moisture then it is time to open a new one – never try to restore its moisture.
  • Cleaning - When the lens is sitting in the solution it is cleaning the lens for you, however, for further cleaning you can apply 3-5 drops on the side of the lens and gently rub the lens for 10 seconds and then rinse. Keep in mind that it may be easier to handle the lens with short nails opposed to long nails, which can easily tear the lens or carry a bacteria build-up.
  • Storing - In order to store the lenses, make sure to fill with fresh solution and place your lenses in the lens case after every wear. Make sure the lens is not floating at the top or sitting on the edge of the lid or case and is set at the bottom of the case in order to avoid putting a tear in your lens.

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Section 3: Services Questions

1. How do I return an item?

Please follow the steps below to return an item:
  1. Before returning a product, please obtain an RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization) number by calling us at 1-888-388-3334.
  2. Returns without an RMA number will be rejected.
  3. All products must be returned with any unused warranty cards, instruction booklets, cleaning cloths, and cases when applicable.
  4. The RMA number must be written on the outside of the package and/or on the return shipping label. Any returned items that are not accompanied by an official RMA number will not be accepted.
  5. The RMA expires within 30 days of issue.
  6. We are not responsible for any lost packages. Returns must be sent prepaid by a trackable carrier such as UPS, Federal Express or the United States Post Office.

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